Deva Tat and Jesus

One of the "copycat" Christs I did not locate myself was a figure called Deva Tat. Tekton Research Assistant Punkish earned his gold star by finding him; here's his notes:

Found: it's Buddha (according to the Anacalypsis i:5,153)..."Buddha is variously pronounced and expressed Boudh, Bod, Bot, But, Bad, Budd, Buddou, Boutta, Bota, Budso, Pot, Pout, Pota, Poti, and Pouti. The Siamese make the final T or D quiescent, and sound the word Po; whence the Chinese still further vary it to Pho or Fo. In the Talmudic dialect the name is pronounced Poden or Pooden; whence the city, which one contained the temple of Sumnaut or Suman-nath, is called Patten-Sumnaut. The broad sound of the U or Ou or Oo, passes in the variation Patten into A, pronounced Ah or Au; and in a similar manner, when the P is sounded B, we meet with Bad, Bat, and Bhat.

All these are in fact no more than a ringing of changes on the cognate letters B and P, T and D. Another of his names is Saman, which is varied into Somon, Somono, Samana, Suman-Nath, and Sarmana. From this was borrowed the sectarian appellation of Samaneans, or Sarmaneans. A third is Gautama, which is indifferently expressed Gautameh, Godama, Godam, Codam, Cadan, Cardam, and Cardana.

A fourth is Saca, Sacya, Siaka, Shaka, Xaca, Xaca-Muni or Xaca-Menu and Kia, which is the uncompounded form of Sa-Kia. A fifth is Dherma, or Dharma, or Dherma-rajah. A sixth is Hermias, Her-Moye, or Heri-Maya. A seventh is Datta, Dat-Alreya, That-Dalna, Date, Tat or Tot, Deva-Tut or Deva-Twasta. An eighth is Jain, Jina, Chin, Jain-Deo, Chin-Deo, or Jain-Eswar. A ninth is Ahran. A tenth is Mahi-Man, Mai-Man, or (if Om is added) Mai-Man-Om.

An eleventh is Min-Eswara, formed by the same title Min or Man or Menu joined to Eswara. A twelfth is Gomat or Gomat-Eswara. A thiteenth, when he is considered as Eswara or Siva, is Ma-Esa or Har-Esa; that is to say, the great Esa or the Lord Esa. A fourteenth is Dagon or Dagun, or Dak-Po. A fifteenth is Tara-Nath. And a sixteenth is Arca-Bandhu or Kinsman of the Sun."

In all that, Higgins gives a single reference to George Stanley Faber, Origin of Pagan Idolatry (1816) subheading: Ascertained from Historical Testimony and Circumstantial Evidence. !!! One review of Faber calls the work "insular, complacent, and interminable."

So anyone who uses Deva Tat is trying to get two pagan copycat Christs for the price of one.